Filed under Entertainment

Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Kimbra has recently released “Everybody Knows,” the first single off of her third album Primal Heart, slotted for release in 2018. It seems a lifetime ago that Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” was playing on every radio station and won the Grammy for Record of the Year. In the year of electropop and club music, it almost does not make sense that an indie art pop song became such a hit. Gotye has yet to release music since, but what about the other artist on the track, Kimbra?

In the same year that “Somebody That I Used To Know” was released, Kimbra released her own debut album Vows, an eclectic collection of pieces including elements of satire, social commentary, new love, old love, and life as a woman. She uses the full range of her voice, alternating between a rich, controlled tone and loose scatting. The album won a handful of Australian and New Zealandish music awards, including an ARIA for “Best Female Solo Artist” and a Tui for “Album of the Year.” In 2014, Kimbra followed her first album with The Golden Echo, a rich, flowing album with an experimental sound, touching upon her experiences with passing loves. Although a much more cohesive and honest album than her first, the album does not leave much room to breathe.

“I think I’ve got a little more confidence to share my vulnerabilities with people,” Kimbra says about her upcoming album. “That’s always a frightening thing to do, you know? Because it’s a lot easier to dress up and invent characters. The hardest thing is just to tell it how it is and present yourself honestly to people.”

Kimbra raises an interesting point about how artists express themselves through their work. While Vows was a collection of eclectic songs, many of the songs were written from a character’s perspective, exaggerated and satirized in figurative language to get a point across. The Golden Echo, while teeming with overwritten lyrics, presented each song as a different sensual experience that all began to blend together toward the end. It felt closer to Kimbra’s true identity, but did much worse commercially. The question is, do we want Kimbra to be more genuine if being genuine has generally produced her worse music?

Kimbra’s involvement in the production side of music, as well as her and eagerness to experiment, have always been her strongest points. The trouble is, Kimbra has always had more trouble expressing her true self than when hiding behind a caricature. Her distance from her lyrics allows her to more clearly control the narrative, creating both mystery and anticipation. When she writes more literally, her songs tend to feel more ephemeral.

Take “Settle Down,” the debut single off of Vows and arguably Kimbra’s most distinctive song. The entire first verse is made up of a loop of Kimbra’s scatting while she sings over it in a rich, straightforward tone. She sings “I wanna settle down / Won’t you settle down with me?” while criticizing the dreams society bestows upon young girls to have a perfect nuclear family that boys are not taught to desire at all. Yet, “Settle Down” is only the tip of the iceberg in an album that explores a vast range of concepts.

If “Settle Down” is emblematic of Kimbra at her sharpest, “Miracle” is emblematic of Kimbra at her loosest. “Miracle,” the most popular song off of The Golden Echo, is a fun and delightful expression of love at its happiest in the form of a modern disco pop track. While “Miracle” is catchy and enjoyable, it does not leave room for deeper thought, and the same can be said for the majority of the songs on The Golden Echo, including the much more underwhelming and overproduced songs. Every song on Vows is deliberate, even at its most vulnerable and wild. The Golden Echo aims to capture both genuine emotion and the unexpected in each piece, until each unexpected sound is barely a surprise anymore.

For now, “Everybody Knows” is a stripped-down, no-bells-or-whistles type of song, as well as none of the distance of Vows or the forced unexpectedness of The Golden Echo. As for the rest of her third album, we will have to see in Primal Heart in 2018.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Everything You Missed at the AMAs

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream Sets a Magical Start to the Holiday Season

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Diversity and Culture on Display at the High Museum

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    The Discussion Does Not End With Harvey Weinstein

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Who is SAINt JHN?

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Post Malone Concert Gave Split Reviews

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    “Dissect” Forces Us to Listen with a Purpose

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    Droppin’ Mics and Droppin’ Prayers

  • Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

    Entertainment

    AJR Raises Questions of Artist Authenticity

The student news site of Oxford College of Emory University
Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album