Filed under Entertainment

Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For those of us who love television shows, we all experience the absolute heartbreak after viewing a series finale. Season finales are bad enough, but the ending of a series means the ending of a story that the viewer was connected to. Many people experience legitimate withdrawals once a show they love has ended, since their viewing habits have been unwillingly terminated. This withdrawal has been experienced by the viewers of director Michael Schur’s The Office and Parks and Recreation.

These shows are essential to the humor of the current American teenagers and twenty-somethings; they both managed to create a whole subcategory of humor for high school and college students. However, after a proud 10 and 7 seasons, respectively, both shows reached their ends, leaving behind a significant impact on the way millions of people express comicality. However, hope is not lost. Harvard graduate Michael Schur has two projects that are currently airing which have true potential to be the next generation’s Office and Parks and Rec.

The first is Brooklyn Nine Nine, an incredibly underrated show with four seasons under its belt (the fifth season is currently airing). The show takes the classic police and crime drama and turns the camera from the criminal activity onto the activities and dynamics within the police office in the 99th police precinct of modern-day Brooklyn. The story follows Detective Jake Peralta (Andy Samberg) and his friends on the force as they make their way through whatever the streets of New York have to throw at them, in addition to their own relationship struggles, breakups, crushes, divorces, adoptions, and workplace bickering. As per the style of Parks and Rec, Brooklyn Nine Nine tackles big, real-life issues in a comedic way, making the problem and its solution obvious. This integration is done in such a subtle way that the issues depicted seem absurd and almost a part of the fictional world of the 99th precinct, and then the audience is lead to remember that these are problems dealt with in their world as well. Fans of the Nine Nine have seen everything from racial profiling to LGBT rights, smoking cigarettes to drug abuse, prison inmate maltreatment to mistreatment of women in the workplace. The reason why the fan base is growing is that despite being incredibly honest about the issues, Brooklyn Nine Nine is a genuinely funny show. The characters stay consistent, without being boring. They are real people that the viewer can connect with, while still providing a comedic, stress-free outlet.

The Good Place, on the other hand, still provides the same character familiarity, but with an incredibly existential premise. Eleanor Shellstrop, a saleswoman for fraudulent diabetes pills, dies of an accident in a parking lot, and gets sent to “The Good Place.” Upon arrival, she notices that she is not who everyone thinks she is; they believe her to be a human rights lawyer who saved the lives of children internationally. The show follows her as she attempts to keep her true identity secret in this utopia that is the opposite of everything she liked on earth. The contrast between the bright colors, beautiful set, happy characters and then the realization that all of this is happening because of the death of these people and that if there is a “good place,” then there must be a “bad place” all adds to the slightly unsettling feeling that viewing this show brings. That feeling is intentional. The creators of the show are intentionally bringing humor to a topic that is notoriously taboo to discuss in American society. It is a truly unique blend that is not often expressed in television. For the casual philosopher, The Good Place is a must-see.

These shows may not have the classic cut-away scenes that made The Office and Parks and Rec famous, but both Brooklyn Nine Nine and The Good Place have a fresh outlook on our current world while still bringing a new wave of comedy for the next generation of director Michael Schur’s viewers. For those who just want to laugh and have an extra twenty minutes, these shows are highly recommended, from one television fan to the other.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Diversity and Culture on Display at the High Museum

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    The Discussion Does Not End With Harvey Weinstein

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Who is SAINt JHN?

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Post Malone Concert Gave Split Reviews

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    “Dissect” Forces Us to Listen with a Purpose

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Kimbra Announces New Self-Realized Album

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Droppin’ Mics and Droppin’ Prayers

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    AJR Raises Questions of Artist Authenticity

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    The Return of Taylor Swift

  • Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec

    Entertainment

    Terrific Tarheel State – More that NC has to Offer

The student news site of Oxford College of Emory University
Hope is Not Lost for Fans of The Office and Parks & Rec