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Federer Fights Back to the Top

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A 20 year career. Over 1300 matches. 69 grand slam appearances. And now, after a grueling five set match against long-time rival Rafael Nadal, 18 grand slam titles. Roger Federer has broken many records during his time in the professional circuit. However, this Australian Open win stands out from the rest.

After taking a six month hiatus from the court to heal a hurt adductor muscle in which time he missed both the US Open and the Olympics, Federer returned to the Australian open ranked number 17. He was expected to get to the fourth round if he was lucky. Instead, he fought through a tough draw to face Nadal in the finals. The two have played each other over thirty-five times, making their rivalry one of the most intense and consistent in tennis history.

Their styles of play complement each other almost too perfectly. Federer’s game relies on finesse and placement. He plays tennis as if it is a game of chess, using his one-handed backhand and quick hands to turn each point into a serious of strategic maneuvers. Nadal on the other hand relies on power and spin. His coach forced him to  switch from playing right-handed to left-handed when he was in the juniors, giving him the advantage of lefty-spin on his serve and the ability to overwhelm his opponents with cross-court rallies to their backhand. The power of his strokes and his speed on the court are the perfect match for Federer’s game. Needless to say, whenever the two play each other, they take the game to another level.

This Australian Open final was no exception. Stretching over three and a half hours, the five set match ended with a 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 for Federer. It was his first grand slam title since 2012, and the shock of the moment brought him to tears as he knelt on the court. Many thought that his career had ended with that 2012 Wimbeldon win because of his age, but this win proves that Federer’s time on the court is far from over.

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Federer Fights Back to the Top